Why are military families showing up at food banks? 

December 17, 2020

Even a year ago, more than one out of 10 military families said they were having trouble getting enough food. The pandemic has added to the problem and food banks say they are seeing the effect. 

The New York Times explains: 

Spouses of active-duty troops have lost jobs, the same as thousands of other Americans, but are often the least likely to be able to find new ones. Children who rely on free or reduced meals at school no longer are receiving them, and military families often have more children than the national average. 

While many poor civilian families have turned to federal food programs for support, military families often receive a housing allowance that renders them ineligible for food assistance, a quirk in the law that Congress has repeatedly failed to resolve. 

The most junior enlisted personnel earn $1,733 to $2,746 a month; 7 percent to 18 percent of military families and veterans have had someone in their house seek emergency food assistance, according to a report from the advocacy group Blue Star Families. 

While military families make up a small portion of the 37 million Americans struggling with food insecurity, hunger experts say most Americans have no idea that people serving in the military often need to rely on help to eat. 

Poynter
Why are military families showing up at food banks?
December 17, 2020 

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